Counter

Visitors: 1227369
Home arrow I N J U S T I C E arrow Introduction
Introduction
I N J U S T I C E PDF Print E-mail

 
FILM BACKGROUND PDF Print E-mail


Injustice is a documentary feature film that follows the struggles for justice by the families of people that have died in police custody. Between 1969 and 1999 over one thousand people died in police custody in England. Not one police officer has ever been convicted for any of these deaths. Injustice depicts how Brian Douglas, Joy Gardner, Shiji Lapite and Ibrahima Sey met violent deaths at the hands of the police and documents a five year period when their families came together to fight for the truth.

Read more...
 
SCREENING INJUSTICE 2002 PDF Print E-mail
Countries where police and paramilitary forces kill with impunity, where the press sings to the rulers tune and journalists who dare to write about what they see are stopped either by force or by threats of legal action are described by the United Kingdoms politicians and media as dictatorships. But in the UK, police officers can kill, safe in the knowledge that they will not be prosecuted for their actions, even if they are found by a jury to have been unlawfully killed.

Since 1969 over 1000 people have died in police custody. No police officer has ever been convicted for any of these deaths. INJUSTICE exposes and opposes this outrage. It is a call for justice by the families of the deceased. It is a voice the police are now trying to stop.

Read more...
 
FILMING INJUSTICE 2001 PDF Print E-mail

Death in Custody

A few years ago Amer Rafique, a healthy young student finished work in a restaurant on the Wilmslow Road in Manchester. It was the early hours of the morning. It was also the Muslim festival of Eid and thousands of youth had spent the day celebrating. Amer Rafique was stopped by police officers. Amer's friend witnessed what happened to him. Amer was assaulted by the officers, thrown into a van and taken to Platt Lane police station. A few minutes drive away. Amer's friend informed his parents of his arrest. Amer's mother asked his father to contact the police in case they beat her son. The father replied, 'this is not Pakistan. Things like this do not happen here.'

Amer Rafique was so badly attacked by the police, he had to have one eye removed. Sight in his other eye was damaged and his jaw boned needed surgery. Amer Rafique was lucky. He lived.

But luck didn't hold out for Joy Gardner, Shiji Lapite, Brian Douglas, Ibrahim Sey and the thousand or so other's who since 1969 have died in police custody in England and Wales. This figure does not include those who have died in prisons and mental institutions or immigration detention centres.

Read more...
 
IMPACT OF INJUSTICE 2003 PDF Print E-mail
Between 1969 and 1999 over one thousand people died in police custody in England. No police officer to date has ever been convicted for any of these deaths. The deaths continue and so does the cover-up. Injustice is the story of the struggles for justice by the families of some those killed by the police.

Injustice has been seen by tens and thousands of people in many corners of the globe. Millions more have heard of the film and it's basic message - that there are human rights abuses perpetuated by police in the UK. On 10th December 2002, International Human Rights Day, novelist Lindsey Collins helped to organise a screening of INJUSTICE in Mauritius. Following the screening she wrote:

Read more...